HPV VACCINATION: INCREASING PARENTAL AWARENESS ON PREVENTING CANCER IN THEIR CHILDREN


  • Adeola Areo Prairie View A&M University
  • Kia Crawford Prairie View A&M University
  • Chichy Nwachukwu Prairie View A&M University
Keywords: HPV, HPV vaccines, cervical cancer, genital warts

Abstract


HPV is responsible for almost all cervical, anal, oropharynx, penile, vaginal cancers and 90% of genital warts (Rahman, Laz, McGrath, & Berenson, 2014). HPV infection often occurs shortly after initiation of sexual activity. In one study of college-aged women, the cumulative incidence of any HPV infection at 1 year after sexual intercourse was 28.5%, and increased to almost 50% by 3 years (Wang & Palefsky, 2015). HPV is usually transmitted through vaginal or anal intercourse, but it can occur through oral-genital or genital-genital contact as well (Wang & Palefsky, 2015). Currently in the United States, there are three vaccines approved for the prevention of HPV. The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine administration of HPV vaccine at ages 11 and 12 for girls and boys, with catch-up vaccinations through age 26 for females and age 21 for males.

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Author Biographies

Adeola Areo, Prairie View A&M University
Family Nurse Practitioner Student at Prairie View A&M University College of Nursing
Kia Crawford, Prairie View A&M University
Masters of Nursing Student
Chichy Nwachukwu, Prairie View A&M University
Masters of Nursing Student
Published
04-25-2019

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How to Cite
Areo, A., Crawford, K., & Nwachukwu, C. (2019). HPV VACCINATION: INCREASING PARENTAL AWARENESS ON PREVENTING CANCER IN THEIR CHILDREN. Journal of Student Research. Retrieved from https://www.jofsr.org/index.php/path/article/view/708