Ottoman Decline: Military Adaptation in the Ottoman Empire, 1683-1699.


  • Stewart Kerr University of Regina Trinity College Dublin
  • Ian Germani University of Regina
Keywords: Ottoman Empire History, Siege of Vienna, European History, Military History.

Abstract


The Siege of Vienna in 1683 by the Ottoman army marks a key shift in the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire. The power of the Ottomans had continuously risen since 1453 but the defeat of the Ottoman army at Vienna marked the beginning of Ottoman decline in military and geographical power. The years following the siege forced the Ottomans to fight a united alliance of Austrian, Venician, and Polish armies from Europe. This article follows the events from the siege of Vienna through to the year 1699, when the war following the siege, finally came to an end with the Ottomans seceeding land to all three of its European opponents. By tracing the academic debate on what impacted the Ottoman defeat the most, the article explores the different theories behind why the Ottomans were defeat and what were the causes for the shift in power away from the Ottoman Empire toward the countries in Europe.

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Author Biographies

Stewart Kerr, University of Regina Trinity College Dublin

Graduated from the University of Regina with a B.A. Honours in History, in 2016.

Current Masters student at Trinity College Dublin.

Ian Germani, University of Regina
Advisor
Published
12-31-2018

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How to Cite
Kerr, S., & Germani, I. (2018). Ottoman Decline: Military Adaptation in the Ottoman Empire, 1683-1699. Journal of Student Research, 7(2), 4-13. Retrieved from https://www.jofsr.org/index.php/path/article/view/503
Section
Review Articles